London, England

IFSA Study in London Plus

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Program Overview

MORE ACADEMIC OPTIONS TO MATCH YOUR AMBITIONS

CHANGE IS HAPPENING
Staring Spring 2025, the IFSA Study in London program replaces the IFSA Study in London Plus program. The enhanced IFSA Study in London program includes new computer, business, biosciences, and health science classes, and the option to take an elective at Queen Mary, University of London. Please visit IFSA Study in London.

Learn along with students from the UK (and around the world) with a class at Queen Mary University of London, and explore today’s relevant topics with your IFSA classmates. Your centrally located apartment makes it easy to explore the best of London, from Camden Market to West End theatres to Hyde Park. With excursions to UK icons like Windsor Castle, Stonehenge, and Brighton, this affordable program has it all.

This is an exclusive IFSA-Designed Program. Learn more about these affordable programs here.

Details at a Glance

Application deadline

Fall: April 15
Spring: Oct. 15

Minimum GPA

3.00

Credit load

12–17

Housing

Apartment/Flat, Single Room Option

Instruction language

English

Language prerequisites

None

Visa required?

Not in most cases. Learn more.

Apply Now

Academics

Select one direct-enroll class at Queen Mary, University of London. Some popular options are listed below, but you will have access to any class available to visiting students. Then, enroll in IFSA elective classes to complete your schedule.

CHART Your Course
Find the classes you need fast with CHART. Our easy-to-use tool shows you classes recently taken by IFSA students.

IFSA ELECTIVE CLASSES
All classes are open to all students. Prerequisites for some classes may be required. Please note, not all classes may be offered in a given semester depending on enrollment. Click on each link below for a detailed class syllabus.

Arts and Humanities

Directed Research
This class offers a unique opportunity for students to delve deeply into host context research projects. Students will be guided through projects that are both feasible in the study abroad context and relevant to their broader intellectual interests. The class is structured through regular individual meetings with a faculty mentor to discuss the formation and execution of a research plan and, depending on the specific project, the possibility to conduct field- or internet-based research. At the end of the semester, students present a formal research paper. (3 U.S. semester credit hours)

Fantasy in the Real World: Literature through the Sociological Lens
Fantasy literature has great power – but does it also have great responsibility? This course looks at mainstream and fringe fantasy literature from the past century and the power that it has in modern society at large. We will examine its creation, consumption, and its ability to impact the real world. Using works such as Harry Potter, His Dark Materials, The Lord of the Rings, and The Game of Thrones, as well as lesser-known writings, we will embrace the fantasy genre as a safe space to explore sociological topics that are difficult to clarify in the real world, such as race, gender, class, and political processes. (3 U.S. semester credit hours)

Intercultural Communications for the Global Workplace 
Designed to help students communicate effectively with people from diverse cultural backgrounds, this course utilizes intercultural theory to explore the complexity of culture through paradox, stereotypes, verbal and non-verbal communication, personal beliefs and values, and strategies for building cultural intelligence and adaptability. Examination of U.K. work environments, professional practices, and business etiquette is an important and underpinning feature of the class. (3 U.S. semester credit hours)

Sustainability and the Global City
This class introduces urban sustainability from multiple disciplinary perspectives. It aims to provide students with the theoretical and methodological tools with which to evaluate potential for sustainable urbanism. Focusing on London alongside comparative global case studies, students will be exposed to urban planning and both natural and build environments in order to evaluate the common challenges and successes related to sustainability efforts. Through experiential learning opportunities, students will develop first-hand context as they examine various facets of sustainable urbanization in London. (3 U.S. semester credit hours)

Trends Start Here: New Media and Behavior
As individuals increasingly consume news from sources of personal choice and become producers of news through social media engagement, this class investigates communication patterns and human action. The relationship between media reporting and its impact on the psyche and decision-making provides a basis for course discussions. How does social networking affect our views of ourselves and others? How does our personal selectivity in news media consumption impact our choices and communications behavior? (3 U.S. semester credit hours)

Urban Identities: Gender, Race, and Class in London
Drawing from anthropology and sociology, this course utilizes intercultural learning theories to foster awareness of one’s own perspectives as well as those of the myriad communities that comprise London. Multiple approaches to framing the multicultural city and appreciating common and contested spaces as inherent to urban diversity are included. This course will examine the role, function, and effects of identity as it relates to the lived experiences of Londoners. While case studies examine gender, race, and class specifically, the course will approach identity from the perspective of intersectionality, in which the dimensions of diversity are understood as the simultaneous interplay of multiple factors. (3 U.S. semester credit hours)

Computer Science Classes

Introduction to Machine Learning
The class provides an introduction to machine learning (ML), focusing on both solid and reliable theoretical foundations and ability to use its methods in practice. In the theoretical part, the focus is on understanding the variety of state-of-the-art ML models and algorithms. The models for ML range from geometrical, to probabilistic and logical. Students will learn how to distinguish these models and how to use them effectively. Several specific models and algorithms will be discussed, including regression, clustering, decision trees and neural networks, and deep learning. The applications of ML in data analytics will also be analyzed. Concurrently, students develop a solution for a test problem using tools discussed in the class, such as git, python, etc. The practical experience with ML algorithms is helpful in assessing the effectiveness of ML algorithms and provides an understanding of the key role of data selection and the evaluation of results. (3 U.S. semester credit hours)

Psychology

The Psychology of Crime and Justice in the UK
This class will follow the historical evolution of forensic psychology from Jack the Ripper to Julian Assange. Is a criminal mind born as such, or is the criminal a product of their environment? What role do governments and societies play in facing crime? Students will gain a foundation in relevant areas of psychology and psychoanalysis and then examine how that science interacts with real-world judicial systems. Additional topics will include punishment, treatment, and rehabilitation; assessment and intervention; and how dimensions of privilege can impact perceptions of crime and justice in both conscious and subconscious ways. (3 U.S. semester credit hours)

Social Psychology
A comparison of familiar social settings with unfamiliar social norms and behaviors abroad, this class explores the basic theory and research of social psychology – studying the interaction between individuals and social groups and how the behavior of groups and individuals within them is mutually affected. Students will demonstrate and discuss the pillar concepts of social psychology, including conformity, conflict, persuasion, helping, perceptions, and social identity. Students will expand on the roots of feelings, beliefs, attitudes, and behavior locally and globally and explore your own attitudes and identity. (3 U.S. semester credit hours)

QUEEN MARY FEATURED DIRECT-ENROLL MODULES

Elective classes, including lab classes, are available at Queen Mary, University of London. Queen Mary requires a 3.0 GPA minimum for enrollment in its classes.

Arts & Social Sciences

  • Art Histories: An Introduction to the Visual Arts in London
  • British Horror: Film, Television, and Literature
  • How Do You Know? From the Culture of Facts to Post-Truth Society
  • Labor Law: Individual Protections, Human Rights and Workplace Justice
  • Shakespeare: The Play, the Word and the Book
  • The Anthropocene: Between the Natural and Social Sciences

Business & Economics

  • Consumer Behavior
  • Financial Accounting
  • Gender at Work
  • Health Economics
  • Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Operations Management

Computer Science

  • Algorithms and Data Structures
  • Computer Graphics
  • Database Systems
  • Introduction to Multimedia
  • Logic and Discrete Structures
  • Signals and Systems Theory

Psychology

  • Cognitive Psychology (fall only)
  • Health Psychology (fall only)
  • Psychology of Emotion (spring only)
  • Psychology of Individual Differences (spring only)

Students who enroll in fall term modules within the School of Economics and Finance or the School of Biological and Behavioral Sciences will complete final assessments online in January. Queen Mary does not allow alternate arrangements to be made for either full degree or study abroad students, including IFSA students.

Lab & Field Trip Fees
Please review syllabi and course materials when registering for direct-enroll classes. Certain classes may have a one-off lab or field trip fee disclosed in the syllabus or during the first meeting of the class. These fees are not included in your IFSA program fee. You will be responsible for these fees, whether they are billed and paid by IFSA or billed to you.

Directed Research
Engage in individualized field research with faculty experts on a contemporary issue of interest. Regular meetings with faculty will assist in the formation and execution of research plans, and they will guide you on how to thoughtfully and critically integrate academic research with experiential learning. You will sharpen your written and oral communication skills through the development of articulate and comprehensive research that is respectful to the sensitivities of the local culture.

If you chose to research live human subjects, live animals or another topic that is deemed by IFSA to be required to be reviewed by the Institutional Research Board (IRB) at your home institution, then you will have to file your project with your home institution’s IRB board and submit your result to IFSA. Your IFSA Enrollment Counselor will review your application materials to help determine if you must file with IRB.

For more detailed information and examples of previous student placements, contact your IFSA Enrollment Counselor.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

Eligibility

  • You must be at least 18 years of age. Students under 18 may be accepted on a case-by-case basis.
  • You must be currently attending or recently graduated from a U.S. or Canadian community college, technical college, two-year college, four-year college, or four-year university.
  • You must have completed at least one (1) full-time semester of study at your home institution before the beginning of the term.

GPA
The minimum GPA for this program is 2.0. However, if selecting elective classes at Queen Mary, University of London, a 3.0 GPA is required.

Recommendation Letter
Your application to this program will require one (1) academic letter of recommendation if selecting elective classes at Queen Mary, University of London.

 

TRANSCRIPT
Upon completion of your program, IFSA will send an official Butler University transcript to your home university with your coursework converted to the U.S. semester credit hour system. You will also have access to an unofficial transcript in your IFSA Student Portal. The transcript reflects classes taken, credits attempted, and grades earned during your term abroad. This service is included in your study abroad program at no additional cost. See our Transcripts page for more information.

Excursions

Activities and excursions are designed to pull you into the communities you visit and encourage cultural connections of every kind. There’s no extra fee to participate in these optional outings—everything is included in your program fee.

Below are a selection of activities and excursions from previous terms; options may vary for your program. Due to the seasonal nature of many of program activities, we cannot guarantee a specific activity or excursion will be available in a given term or program.

Activities

  • The Great British Bake Off Experience: Step into the famous white tent and don your apron for this immersive baking experience. Perfect for fans of The Great British Bake Off, you’ll work in pairs and bake a dessert against the clock that will be judged by the head baker. You’ll even be able to take home your creation at the end!
  • West End Theatre Performance: No time in the UK would be complete without a trip to the West End, London’s famous theatre district. Shows are chosen that provide context or different perspectives on London/the UK/Europe. Recent examples include Operation Mincemeat and Cabaret.
  • Harry Potter Studio Tour: Explore The Making of Harry Potter permanent exhibit which offers an authentic behind-the-scenes look into the making of the films.
  • Sustainability Garden: Visit a community garden started to rewild urban space and respond to the challenges of urban sustainable food production in line with the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals. By speaking to gardeners, learn more about the impact of sustainable practices on the biodiversity of urban areas and how they’re trying to widen participation in their local community. Make sure to dress appropriately because we’ll be getting our hands dirty!

Excursions

  • Stonehenge and Bath Visit: Stonehenge has stood on Salisbury Plain for around 5,000 years and it’s still unknown how the prehistoric monument came to rest there! Make up your own mind during this visit and discover the fascinating theories behind these rocks. You’ll learn about Stonehenge from the fascinating exhibits and be able to enjoy a virtual sunrise as it rises over the prehistoric stones! Afterward, travel to the Roman city of Bath for a walking tour of this World Heritage city once home to Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Gainsborough, Lord Nelson, and Beau Nash. Then prepare to travel back 2,000 years to the Roman era with a visit to the Roman Baths.
  • Piers and Queers Brighton Trip: Since the 18th century, Brighton has become a cosmopolitan place of recreation, escape, and freedom. A destination for people who didn’t conform. With an LGBTQ+ population now estimated at 15%, Brighton celebrated England’s first civil partnerships, and hosts the UK’s largest Pride event as well as Europe’s first Trans Pride, rightly earning its title as the LGBTQ+ Capital of Britain. Peers and Queers is a tour of Brighton from LGBTQ+ perspective. This colorful 90-minute walk along the beach and historic city center takes in more than 200 years of history including Regency Dandies, 1950s lesbian and gay life, and political activism. Afterward, there’s time for a walk on the pier and fish and chips, just watch out for seagulls!
  • Big Welsh Weekend: Delve into the rich history of Wales and explore its unique culture and its complex relationship with the rest of the UK on a weekend that takes in the famous Tintern Abbey, the historic Raglan Castle, the Blaenavon coal mines, and St Fagan’s, a museum that has preserved buildings and cultural practices from Welsh history. Spend the night in Cardiff, the Welsh capital, and discover the Cardiff Bay area, home of the Welsh Parliament.
  • Yorkshire Adventure: Explore the vibrant and historic county of Yorkshire on a weekend trip where you’ll discover how this English region has contributed to the UK’s cultural landscape. Highlights may include the Bronte Parsonage in Haworth, the Piece Hall in Halifax, the Victorian model village of Saltaire, or the imposing Harewood House in Leeds.

Housing and Meals

Housing

Apartment/Flat, Single Room Option

Meals

Self-Catering

Details

Students live in furnished flats (apartments) selected by IFSA, with IFSA students as flatmates.

  • Living space: Each flat contains single bedrooms, each with its own private bathroom.
    • Bedrooms include bed, desk, chair, wardrobe, and light for each student.
    • Comfortable space to cook, eat, socialize, and study either in your flat or in convenient common areas.
    • Linens, except towels, are typically provided.
  • Meals:  There is no meal plan. Students cook or purchase their own meals. Some flats have private kitchens, others include shared kitchens. Most are fully equipped; if not, kitchenware is easy to purchase nearby. Flatmates say cooking and eating together is a fun, social part of their day.
  • Commute: Varies by location. Expect a 40- to 50-minute trip via local train services, the Tube (the London subway), or bus.

Sample housing

Explore Vita Lewisham, one housing option, to see what your London home might be like:

  • Location: Lewisham, an area in southeast London undergoing substantial regeneration, particularly following its tenure as London Borough of Culture in 2022. Lewisham Shopping Centre, a five-minute walk away, is home to over 70 stores. Across the street is Glass Mill Leisure Centre, with gym, pool, sauna, and steam room. Two-minute walk to Lewisham train station.
  • Commute: 40 minutes by train/Tube to the IFSA Program Center in Mayfair. 40 minutes by Docklands Light Railway/foot to Queen Mary, University of London.
  • Single rooms: Rooms include one double bed, desk, chair, wardrobe, and TV. Bed linens provided. Studio rooms include private kitchen with oven, stove, refrigerator, and microwave. Other rooms are part of cluster flats: six single rooms with private bathrooms, a shared kitchen, and living space. Kitchenware provided.
  • Meals: No meal plan. Students purchase meals or prepare food in shared kitchens. Breakfast available in the reception area on weekday mornings.  Free coffee 24/7.
  • Common spaces: Three private dining rooms, a bar, study spaces, a gym with dance studio, and a games room.
  • Other details: Unlimited Wi-Fi, staff and security on site 24/7. Laundry facilities on-site. Cleaning provided every two weeks. The residence runs a full social calendar.
  • Nearby:  The bustling Greenwich area, home to Greenwich Market, renowned museums, and Greenwich Park (where the Eastern and Western Hemispheres meet)—five minutes away via Docklands Light Railway. (Watch for celebrities: Greenwich frequently stands in as London and occasionally Paris in film and television productions.) Central London is 15 minutes away via train, so it’s easy to get to London Bridge and Charing Cross, the historic center of London.

Dates and Fees

Term
Term begins
Term ends
Program costs
Application deadline
Fall 2024
September 4, 2024
December 21, 2024
$21,975
Passed

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Eleni Katsarelas

Eleni Katsarelas

Enrollment Counselor